$25
  • accidentally took a long ass nap (oops) but I got my sisters record player working so she can finally listen to her vinyl tomorrow on her birthday (with some surprise records on my way home from work)

  • pineapple juice

  • (Source: injectedthoughts)

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  • rubeole:

    Eric Judor, Wrong Cops.

    Musique.

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  • (Source: antlionman)

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  • pixography:

    Zdzisław Beksiński

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  • thinksquad:

    When President Obama on Tuesday highlighted 19 executive actions he says he is taking to improve the mental health of U.S. troops and veterans, one of them centered on a particularly novel effort: The development of new computer chips designed to modulate the nervous system to help with everything from arthritis to post-traumatic stress.

    The project is headed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, a Pentagon agency that develops a variety of high-tech equipment for the U.S. military. It’s known as the Electrical Prescriptions program, or ElectRx (pronounced “electrics”). Program officials say the goal is to develop a technology that could help people heal more quickly through the use of biosensors and electromagnetic devices that control human organs.

    “Instead of relying only on medication, we envision a closed-loop system that would work in concept like a tiny, intelligent pacemaker,” said Doug Weber, the program’s manager. “It would continually assess conditions and provide stimulus patterns tailored to help maintain healthy organ function, helping patients get healthy and stay healthy using their body’s own systems.”

    Obama did not reference the new program directly in his speech Tuesday at the American Legion national convention in Charlotte, N.C. In a joint fact sheet released by the Pentagon and the Department of Veterans Affairs, however, the agencies said DARPA will start a new $78.9 million, five-year research program “to develop new, minimally invasive neurotechnologies that will increase the ability of the body and brain to induce healing.” It’s part of the Obama administration’s larger “BRAIN Initiative,” which involves the National Institutes of Health, DARPA, the National Science Foundation and the Food and Drug Administration, among other organizations.

    Officials say the BRAIN Initiative — which stands for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies — includes a related DARPA effort to build new brain chips that will be able to predict moods to help treat post-traumatic stress. It’s known as the SUBNETS program, short for Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies. Teams at both the University of California, San Francisco, and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston are involved.

    The major hurdle for the ElectRX program may be shrinking the technology needed so that it can be used in the body. Implantable devices already are in use to fight inflammatory diseases and other health problems, but most are about the size of a deck of cards, requiring surgical implantation that can result in side effects, DARPA officials said. They want “ultraminiaturized devices” that would could be inserted through needle injection or other less invasive means.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/checkpoint/wp/2014/08/27/new-obama-plan-calls-for-implanted-computer-chips-to-help-u-s-troops-heal/?hpid=z10

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  • goodnight

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  • nantajoong:

    fraubraun:

    koreanstudentsspeak:

    Left:

    I want a go home I’m tired

    Right:

    Don’t Hit ME

    what’s happenin in korea

    You want to know what’s happening? Korea’s education system is literally the most rotten piece of shit to ever exist. 

    Let me explain the context of the poster on the left. 

    The average time a kid spends in school in the US is 900 to 1000 hours per year, spread between 175-180 days (x)

    In 2007 there were mass student protests in Netherlands because they increased the hours spent in school to 1040 hours per year, or 8 hours a day, 130 days a year. (x)

    Korean high schools, on the other hand, enact a 3150 policy, 225 days of school with 14 hours a day, or from 8 am to 10 pm (x)

    Also due to the private education sector of hagwons and the fierce competition of Korean high schools, basically after school kids go to hagwons, or personal academies, till 2, 3 in the morning, fit in maybe 4, 5 hours of sleep and go back to school. (x)

    It was only in 2012 that schools went from having classes on Saturday excluding the first and third Saturday, and it was only in 2007 when they changed from having class every Saturday. (x)

    This system is literally the epitome of the factory schooling system which comes as a result of a capitalistic schooling system and it works kids too hard which is one of the reasons Korean school kids are some of the unhappiest of pretty much any OECD country. (x)

    For the photo on the right, physical punishment is not fully banned in Korea. 

    Since 2011, Seoul, Gyunggido, Gangwondo, and Julla Bukdo have banned the use of direct physical punishment, or basically hitting kids with either tools or physically with their body. That being said that’s basically only about half of South Korea. 

    Also, indirect physical punishment such as making kids to planks, make them kneel with their hands up, making them run laps, or of the sort is still fully acceptable in all Korean schools. (x)

    Anybody who’s a Korean in a Korean school right now already has experience with getting beat by a teacher and some kids still have to deal with physical punishment by teachers. 

    (via yungmcdonalds)

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  • (Source: iamamark, via quietalonefuck)

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  • Flying Lotus 

    (Source: defjux, via fckyeahundergroundhiphop)

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  • (Source: nolungzradio)

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